28 Comments

I am so glad you are enjoying seeing the world. The Internet has really changed the lifestyle of many. Back in the 1980s and 90s I could not imagine that I could write a book or become a journalist, which were the only writing routes available. Now, anyone with a computer can write and post their work, so that their writing is seen by many people. You can build up confidence and expertise over time. Every time I see my ‘published’ work I get a thrill.

In everything there needs to be a balance. As a mother I would have loved more flexibility. But many people like the office, seeing people and sharing ideas. Some people live alone, or in not great circumstances, so going to the office is good for them. In London, the knock-on effect of ‘working from home’ has been a disaster for the restaurants and shops around the office locations. And the government offices standard of work has decreased significantly, so they have been ordered to spend 60% of their week in the office.

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Well this is a lovely development! I didn’t realize remote work had ballooned into such gains for the digital nomad community. This is definitely a direction I would love my life to go.

I also like how you took some time to explore how remote work could be extended to other fields we don’t usually think of as having that possibility. I think about precedents like traveling doctors or librarians on horseback, and it’s a fascinating thread to trace.

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I love your out-of-the-box thinking when it comes to lifestyle. I traveled through most of my twenties, but tended to just get jobs wherever I was to get by. I love that there are more options now, and not just for those with no responsibilities who are willing to throw caution to the wind. We only get one life, after all, gotta live it to the full!

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Sign me up. 🤓

What about health insurance? Do countries with universal care cover digital nomads?

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There are currently many more jobs than we think that could go fully remote and hybrid. If companies were not so invested in the real estate, they could reduce a lot of overhead with remote work and meeting spaces. It’s entirely possible.

As someone in healthcare, I see its application because especially in older buildings, we’re fighting for room and if half a department need not be there, space can be reclaimed for other uses. For certain duties that require you to be present, then a hybrid option would work. If we are committed to reimagining our workforce and culture, we can see the opportunities. For now, the image of an imposing factory with a long line of employees clocking in is at the back of people’s minds.

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Gosh that sounds like a great freedom to have.

Obviously, to make that work, you need three things (1) a job that allows that flexibility, (2) good job security and/or confidence in the ability to find a new remote job if you have to leave the current job and (3) a job that doesn't gradually creep into requiring greater and greater time commitments.

I'm fairly well off in terms of work/life balance, but I have so much less freedom to schedule my work hours than I did 10-15 years ago just because, over time, I've accumulated more responsibilities, each of which adds to the range of circumstances for which I need to be available on someone else's schedule rather than my own.

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For twenty-five years, my professional writing life was about constant travel from college to college and bookstore to bookstore. That's not my life anymore. So I reached about your working life with a mixture of jealousy and relief.

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